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Robin Gianna, CHANGED BY HIS SON'S SMILE and Revisions!

We invited author Robin Gianna to share with us her revision process.

Connect with Robin on the web:

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Over to Robin now...



I know some writers dread the revision/editing phase of a manuscript.  I actually like it!  I know that when I’m finished, the story will be richer and more pulled-together than in the first draft, which is any writer’s goal.

 

I try to make sure I have enough time between when I finish the book and my deadline that I can set it aside and let it ‘rest’ for a bit in my brain. Two weeks is ideal, but sometimes life happens and I don’t get that full two weeks.  When I’m deeply immersed in a story, it’s hard to see it with impartial eyes. But after the resting period, things that don’t work become more clear when I read it through again.  And often, too, the muse helps out even when I haven’t begun revising yet!  I’ll be in the shower or walking the dog and I’ll have an ah-ha! moment about a scene with a new idea to make it better.

 

Just prior to sitting down to revise, I pull out two writing craft books I love. One is Revision & Self-Editing by James Scott Bell and the other is Writing The Breakout Novel by Donald Maass. The Maass book asks specific questions, and often finding answers to even just a few of them helps me deepen the story or a character. Then I read through my manuscript from beginning to end, and while I get rid of things here and there, I always end up with a higher word count than the first draft.

 

I am blessed to have a wonderful agent, Cori Deyoe of Three Seas Literary Agency, who is a former romance writer.  Thankfully, she enjoys the editing process.  She does a great job finding little spots where a character’s actions don’t ring true for her, or something else that doesn’t quite work. Having that extra set of eyes helps tremendously. Lastly, my editor at Harlequin Mills & Boon, Laurie Johnson, also has a keen eye and her suggestions are always right on target and extremely helpful in the final stage of edits.

 

I guess the bottom line is that it takes a village for me to write and edit a book!  I feel so lucky to have medical experts to consult, great craft books in my library, and great editors to work with.

 

 
 
A family he didn't know he wanted…
When ex-flame Dr. Danielle Sheridan arrives at Chase Bowen's African clinic he's captivated by her… and her little son! Three years ago Chase turned down Dani's surprise marriage proposal—their life was just too dangerous for a family—but he didn't know she was pregnant!
Losing Dani once was hard enough. Losing her twice is not an option. Especially when he's already fallen for his adorable son, Drew. Now Chase is determined to make Dani his again—starting with an undeniable acceptance of her three-year-old proposal!
Buy Link

CHANGED BY HIS SON'S SMILE

18 comments:

  1. Great post! It definitely helps to have a village to help ensure revisions are *just* right! :)

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    1. So true, Meradeth! Thanks for stopping by!

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  2. I like to have time to let my manuscript rest before I tackle revisions too. It makes such a difference when you get that time away.

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    1. So true, Kelly! Another reason to keep those daily word counts and not get too behind, isn't it? :-)

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  3. I find writing something else helps me clear a story from my mind, so I can edit it with a bit of impartiality.

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    1. You know, I don't usually do that but it's a great idea! I think I'll give that a try while 'resting' my next wip - thanks, Patsy!

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  4. Hi Robin, I'm reading this right now and loving it, it's a very exciting Medical in the way that it's set outside of the "normal" hospital situation, loving it! :) Tash

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  5. I'm so happy to hear that, Tash! I would love to hear from you when you're finished with it, to learn what you thought of the whole book. I'm on Facebook, my website is RobinGianna.com, and Twitter @robin_gianna. Thanks so much!

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  6. This sounds like a fun romance and I hope it all works out in the end!

    I like the editing process too- and I definitely need time away from my writing before I can do it justice. It is amazing how different my writing looks when I have had a little break from it. Thanks for sharing the resources you use, Robin. I will have to get them!

    Happy New year to Robin and Nas!
    ~Jess

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  7. Thank you, Jess! Happy New Year to you and yours! May it be healthy and happy. Thanks for stopping by!

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  8. The polishing phase is a lot of work, but it's so rewarding to see the finished product in the end. I'm 40K through my thriller with another 70K to go, but it's tightening up nicely.

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    1. That's a good way to put it, Milo! The reward of having an end result you're happy with is worth slogging through the revision :-) Best of luck with your thriller!

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  9. Revising and editing can be fun; my problem is knowing when to "stop", if you know what I mean.

    This books sounds super. Matter of fact, I just now bought it. (Do you have any idea how dangerous it can be to have my Kindle within reach when I'm on the computer...?)

    Happy New Year!

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    1. Thank you so much, Susan! Would love to know what you think of it!
      I know what you mean about the 'stopping.' I remember an author once saying you're never really 'done,' you just have to know when to be 'done enough' :-)

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  10. I'm usually pretty fed up with my books after I've done my first edits, so I'm very happy to farm them out to other readers, editors and proofreaders! As you say, it's a team effort. Thanks for sharing this! You are published by such professionals, that's real kudos for you too!

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    1. Thank you, Val! Yes, my writer friends and I all moan about how sick we are of the book when we've been revising and revising and are on the home stretch. You feel like you never want to see it again! Then you have that break and in the very final edits you remember why you liked the book :-)

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  11. I love the editing stage as well. There's something special about whipping a great story into shape and making it even better than you first imagined.

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  12. I'm glad I'm not the only crazy one, Lynda! ;-) It definitely is a feeling of satisfaction, isn't it? Though I admit that when I'm all done, I don't want to look at it again for awhile!

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Join the discussion. What do you think?